Creative
lighting design
Colour Exhibition
Portfolio / Exhibition & Museums
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Colour Exhibition

The Fitzwilliam Museum is the art and antiquities museum of the University of Cambridge and a popular tourist attraction that draws in around half a million people each year.

The Colour Exhibition showcased advanced research undertaken by the Fitzwilliam’s curators, scientists and conservators and celebrated modern-day discoveries inspired by collections assembled over 200 years ago.

Overseeing the strategy for the Colour Exhibition at the museum meant Michael Grubb Studio faced specific challenges when presenting colour accurately. Strict conservation requirements had to be adhered to where lighting had to be dimmed to a maximum of 50 Lux.

What We Did

To overcome this challenge we arranged a lighting workshop. We presented various dimming techniques to the client.

This process allowed all members of the project team the chance to review, reflect and comment on their preferred approach. This process also reassured the design team that we were able to represent the entire exhibition accurately.

Stella Panayatova, Head Curator from Fitzwilliam Museum commented, “Michael Grubb Studio are the lighting designers that every exhibition curator dreams of. Professional and personable, imaginative and resourceful, sympathetic to the curator’s vision, attentive to detail and ready with multiple solutions for every challenge.”

“It was a pleasure to work with them on the Colour exhibition.”

The preparations before the event were crucial in establishing the perfect lighting strategy. Our objective was to make the exhibition a resounding success. It also ensured that the installation process was stress-free and an experience everyone enjoyed.

The project received glowing press attention, including references to the lighting design:


 

“The Fitzwilliam Museum best-preserved manuscripts are beautifully lit in this sumptuous show to expose their true artistic glory” – The Guardian

“The displays themselves are lit up, jewel-like” – The Telegraph